Self employment gives you some tax breaks

Self employmentWhen it comes to taxes, being self-employed has some advantages. Whether you work for yourself on a full-time basis or just do a little moonlighting on the side, the government has provided you with a variety of attractive tax breaks.

  • Save for retirement. When you’re self-employed, you’re allowed to set up a retirement plan for your business. Remember, contributing to a retirement plan is one of the best tax shelters available to you during your working years. Take a look at the SIMPLE IRA, SEP IRA, or Solo 401(k), and determine which plan works best for you.
  • Hire your kids. If your business is unincorporated, employing your child under the age of 18 might make sense. That’s because your child’s earnings are exempt from social security, Medicare, and federal unemployment taxes. This year, your son or daughter can earn as much as $6,200 and owe no income taxes. You get to deduct the wages paid as a business expense.
  • Deduct health insurance. Are you paying your own medical or dental insurance? How about long-term care insurance? As a self-employed individual, you may be able to deduct 100% of the cost of these premiums as an “above the line” deduction, subject to certain restrictions.
  • Take business-use deductions. Self-employed individuals can also deduct “mixed-use” items directly against their business income. Use your car for business and you can deduct 56¢ per business mile driven. The business-use portion of your computer purchases, Internet access, and wireless phone bills is also allowable. And if you meet the strict requirements, claiming the home office deduction makes a portion of your home expenses tax-deductible.

Please give us a call to find out more about the tax breaks available to self-employed individuals.
More businesses are using part-time workers Recent job statistics indicate that more employers are using part-timers to deal with variations in workload and for short-term projects. Here are a few tips your business will find useful if you hire part-time workers.

  • Communicate clearly with the part-timer. Explain the person’s duties, the hours and benefits, and the individual to whom the part-timer will report.
  • Tell your full-time staff why you’re hiring the part-timer. Make it clear what that person will and won’t be expected to do.
  • Provide introductory training for the part-time worker. Assign someone the new person can turn to with everyday questions.
  • Monitor the part-timer’s progress. Provide feedback on performance and recognition for doing a good job.

Pay attention to these points if you want hiring part-time workers to be a good choice for your company.

Contact us soon for a year-end tax review
An important part of our service to you is to help identify actions you can take before year-end to minimize your 2014 income tax bill. Accelerating or delaying income and deductions, contributing to retirement plans, and taking investment losses are just a few of the strategies you might want to consider. There are also tax credits that require careful planning or they may be lost. If you’d like to discuss tax-cutting options that fit your particular situation, please contact us soon for a year-end planning review.

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